A CITY DIVIDED

Memphis is a city divided. We are haunted by the assassination of Dr. King, followed by white flight and privatization of schools. The gap between enfranchised and disenfranchised and between black and white is at the root of many of our city’s most significant problems.

The biblical story of the Samaritan woman at the well in John, Chapter 4, brings hope for our city. In first century Israel, Jews and Samaritans lived with these divisions as well. Yet at Jacob’s well, Jesus breaks all conceivable social norms by speaking not only to a Samaritan, but a woman. In this revolutionary conversation, Jesus bridges the divide even deeper than race with three points: you’re worse than you think you are (v. 18), the gospel is greater than you can imagine (v. 14) and worship is our response (v. 24).

Jacob’s Well in Memphis is concerned first with reconciling people to God and second, reconciling people with people. Jesus said that the essence of Christianity could be summed up in two inseparable commandments: Love God, and love thy neighbor. (Matt. 22:37-39)

Not only will black and white, rich and poor interact with each other in service, we will worship and become disciples together.

 

Not only will black and white, rich and poor interact with each other in service, we will worship and become disciples together.

reconciliation

rehabilitation

reciprocation

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